dyslexia

Dyslexia.
A learning disorder caused
by the inability to read
and spell.

A hereditary learning disorder that involves difficulty reading due to problems identifying speech sounds and learning how they relate to letters and words (decoding). Also called reading disability, dyslexia affects areas of the brain that process language.

dyscalculia

Dyscalculia.
A condition that affects
the ability to acquire
arithmetical skills.

Dyscalculic learners may have difficulty understanding simple number concepts, lack an intuitive grasp of numbers, and have problems learning number facts and procedures. Even if they produce a correct answer or use a correct method, they may do so mechanically and without confidence.

dysgraphia

Dysgraphia.
A neurological disorder of
written expression that
impairs writing ability
and fine motor skills.

It is a learning disability that affects children and adults, and interferes with practically all aspects of the writing process, including spelling, legibility, word spacing and sizing and expression.

school readiness

School Readiness.

Refers to whether a child is ready to make an easy and successful transition into school.

dyslexia courses

Online Dyslexic Training
Courses.

Various courses available including courses aimed at the assessment of dyslexic individuals, providing diagnosis specific therapy and creating awareness within the classroom. All SGDA assessments are endorsed by the HPCSA and supported by the DBE.

A note to our students….

We at SGDA can see how difficult it is for you to fit into an educational system where everything you do and the marks you achieve are dependent on your ability to read and write. We hear your stories and know that you are the truly brave ones, fighting for your spot and an equal opportunity to prove what you are truly capable of.

Never ever give up.

Follow your dreams and do not allow people to judge you and decide what you can or cannot do.

Yes, it is hard work. Yes, you will get frustrated. Yes, sometimes all these obstacles might make you feel like it is not worth it. Never ever give up! Keep at it. Use all the available resources you are able to find and do not hesitate to ask for help.

We admire you because you are brave and amazing and we cannot wait to see what you can achieve in the future.

A note to our parents….

SGDA aims to inspire children who are diagnosed with Dyslexia, Dyscalculia or Dysgraphia to be the best they can be and make their dreams come true, despite the challenges they face as a result of their learning disabilities.

Learning disabled children face many challenges that could drag them down into the pits of despair, but instead they can choose not to let a specific learning disability such as dyslexia determine their fate in life.

A professional diagnosis might allow for the opportunity to have an open discussion on the real challenges your dyslexic child is facing. He/she might for the first time ever open up to you and share their hurts and embarrassing moments. Listen, really listen, to the child sitting in front of you, for you might learn quite a bit from this young person that faces many challenges different or similar to the ones you had growing up.

Your child might empower you and your community to have a positive impact on the life of future and other dyslexic children, making a difference for them in ways that truly matters. A child that experiences success, however small, will be inclined to keep on trying and work even harder than they already do. As an adult you can make a big difference. Your input, support and motivation does matter.

Take each other’s hands on this path, there is a bright future out there for our children, even the ones that struggle with reading and writing.

A note to our students…

We at SGDA can see how difficult it is for you to fit into an educational system where everything you do and the marks you achieve are dependent on your ability to read and write. We hear your stories and know that you are the truly brave ones, fighting for your spot and an equal opportunity to prove what you are truly capable of.

Never ever give up.

Follow your dreams and do not allow people to judge you and decide what you can or cannot do.

Yes, it is hard work. Yes, you will get frustrated. Yes, sometimes all these obstacles might make you feel like it is not worth it. Never ever give up! Keep at it. Use all the available resources you are able to find and do not hesitate to ask for help.

We admire you because you are brave and amazing and we cannot wait to see what you can achieve in the future.

A note to our parents…

SGDA aims to inspire children who are diagnosed with Dyslexia, Dyscalculia or Dysgraphia to be the best they can be and make their dreams come true, despite the challenges they face as a result of their learning disabilities.

Learning disabled children face many challenges that could drag them down into the pits of despair, but instead they can choose not to let a specific learning disability such as dyslexia determine their fate in life.

A professional diagnosis might allow for the opportunity to have an open discussion on the real challenges your dyslexic child is facing. He/she might for the first time ever open up to you and share their hurts and embarrassing moments. Listen, really listen, to the child sitting in front of you, for you might learn quite a bit from this young person that faces many challenges different or similar to the ones you had growing up.

Your child might empower you and your community to have a positive impact on the life of future and other dyslexic children, making a difference for them in ways that truly matters. A child that experiences success, however small, will be inclined to keep on trying and work even harder than they already do. As an adult you can make a big difference. Your input, support and motivation does matter.

Take each other’s hands on this path, there is a bright future out there for our children, even the ones that struggle with reading and writing.

Articles and Success Stories

Reading Anxiety

When a child with reading anxiety is called upon to read in class, his/her mind instantly becomes flooded with worries: fears that he/she will stumble over […]

Jim Mc Carthy – A Dyslexic Visual Artist’s Story

My name is Jim Mc Carthy. I'm an Irish Visual Artist, and sign my work as 'Jim'. I'm from Co. Cork in the South of Ireland. […]

Why should dyslexics be allowed more time when writing tests

Why should dyslexics be allowed more time and preferably the maximum allowed, when writing tests, exams and executing assignments? In order to understand the concept of […]

Dyslexia and Prejudice

  Stigma and prejudice. Not effectively evaluating the prevalence of dyslexia has left our education system in a perpetual state of trauma, and is a significant […]